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Don’t trust the bitch i.6

On necessity as a guide

June finally manages to get a job. It’s a terrible economy – she’s still working at the donut place. Successful Wall St. types are hardly human. They take a pleasure well-earned by their success in the suffering or desperation of the unemployed who still pursue employment instead of accepting that their lives would be the easier for welfare…

Chloe rescues her – she knows it’s more important to know people than things. Seducing people in bars is apparently one of the ways in which she gets jobs – in this case for June. June happily accepts, but wants to be judged by her merit. This really means she wants to do a job she feels she deserves – not lowly work in a donut shop. American ambition seems to be taught very well in Indiana, too. But she also wants that fair rules & moral opinions govern business. Surely, necessity is not quite so obedient as men are…

Now June must keep Chloe drunk – her job depends on it, at least up until she signs a contract. Sooner than she thinks, she learns morality is endangered by reasoning about necessity. She does not want Enlightenment enough because she is not ruthless enough. What recalls to her mind her principles? Outrage – being treated as a slave. That’s where morality is useful, it would seem, asserting freedom.

Chloe says June is a food addict. June calls it breakfast, lunch, & dinner. But she eats alone, mostly, watching TV. Chloe’s drinking parties show her all sorts of people whom she can seduce… They are presented as day & night. Having fun & breaking laws are part of the opportunity Chloe discovers in the social nature of drinking. People mind their private good less. Pleasure may lead from the private to the public in certain cases. Chloe later says June is back in the restaurant business. If Enlightenment teaches the good is the useful – Chloe may not find that life worth living.

June watches quiz shows evenings, while Chloe goes out to party. You can say both girls are curious, but one applies her curiosity to action & thinks about what is good for her – the other does not. Exile from Wall St. shows a kind of contemplative inclination in June. Chloe’s immorality shows another part of this inclination – the daring, the chase. A woman with Chloe’s ruthless self-seeking intelligence & June’s learning would be formidable. But not moral, maybe, nor lovely…

The conversation between June’s mom & James suggests this possibility: She teaches him from her gossip how to get the dancer he needs, whose beauty & art are useful to him to win the competition. Celebrity is one possible combination of the useful & the beautiful…